Mastering PyCharm Transcripts
Chapter: Why PyCharm and IDEs?
Lecture: Python runtimes

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0:01 If you're new to Python, you might not realize
0:03 there's actually many different versions and flavors of Python.
0:06 So if you just say Python, you mean something called C Python
0:11 and that's what you get if you go to Python.org and you download it
0:15 or you just go to Linux and type Python, that's C Python.
0:19 But there's actually a bunch of different runtimes
0:21 and sometimes these are called interpreters
0:23 but I don't like the term interpreters, because not all of them are interpreters
0:26 some of them are JIT compilers.
0:28 So runtimes is what I am going to say.
0:30 We have the two sort of direct Python ones I would say,
0:35 on the right here this snake is PyPy,
0:38 and this is a JIT version of the Python runtime,
0:43 implemented in Python, it's very meta
0:45 hence the circle is eating itself, that sort of thing.
0:48 In some circumstances, this can be much faster
0:51 but it doesn't have as much coverage
0:55 of all of the languages, all of the libraries and stuff that you might use
0:58 especially some of the C based extensions and things like that,
1:01 so you don't always want to just use PyPy
1:03 but if you want to, you'll see that it is supported in PyCharm, which is cool.
1:07 Same thing for Cython, we saw that on the feature page just a little bit ago
1:10 and Cython is a way to take Python code and compile it down the machine instructions
1:16 not even JIT compiled, just straight up like C compiled
1:19 but it uses a kind of a flavor of Python
1:22 and that is supported with Intellisense
1:24 and language understanding and everything in PyCharm.
1:26 Then we have the two plugin ones, Jython and IronPython
1:31 and this is plugging into Java and .Net respectively, those are also supported.
1:35 So regardless of how you want to run your Python code
1:38 any of these are supported with language validation and things like that
1:44 in PyCharm, which is pretty awesome.